ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

SCIENCE AND NATURE

Members Only
Bison that lived 3,000 years ago were 37% larger than those living today because of a warming climate — a trend that will accelerate, with bison projected to become 46% smaller by the end of the century. Bison are shaggy sentinels of climate change on the prairie.
"Excess rainfall" this spring has reversed the severe drought the north saw last year, and it's unlikely there will be a drought in the region for the foreseeable future, according to a climate outlook report.
But the wet, cold spring may reduce chick survival and hunter success.
Minnesota DNR wolf pan sets strategy for wolf management in the state.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
Once dismissed as unscientific, there’s now increasing interest in incorporating Indigenous knowledge into the policies and practices of Minnesotans working with forestry and wildlife.
Children attending Prairie Preschool get a hands-on experience in nature, whether learning about animals, insects, plants or lakes and rivers.
The EPA-funded project could help protect water quality and steer fisheries management.
Ariel Bonkoski teaches beginners how to identify wild edibles as foraging popularity grows.
Biophilia is becoming an increasingly popular principle in integrative medicine as researchers are finding health benefits associated with spending time outside.
Regardless of how bad individual years are, the Minnesota Department of Health is not as concerned with year-to-year trends as it is concerned with the big picture over time, said agency tick disease specialist Elizabeth Schiffman.

ADVERTISEMENT

New guidelines generally support state's current wolf population, but could allow hunting and trapping if federal protections end.
The bill would provide money to states and tribes to recover troubled species
The increase in wetlands from the pervious year was the highest ever, but grasslands are declining.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT