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HEALTH

The clinic is set for Aug. 10 and 11.
“Detecting it early can help to better control illness,” Jose Estanisla Aguirre said. “If they wait, sometimes it’s too late. It will take more to heal or recover.”
Studies at the Sanford Center for Biobehavioral Research are looking at how inadequate sleep is related to binge eating and how some people process images of food and body type relate to binge eating. Both studies are recruiting participants.
Gummies and edibles from the program are separate from the hemp-derived edible cannabis products that became legal in Minnesota at the beginning of July.

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Although hospital mergers were supposed to improve cost efficiency, experts agree that the creation of huge conglomerates and hospital networks has driven up U.S. medical costs, which are by far the highest in the world. Many enjoy near-monopoly pricing power.
Last year had twice as many deaths as the state saw 10 years ago, and numbers have climbed significantly since 2018 when there were just over 600.
State Sen. David Tomassoni knows his days are drawing down, yet he'll support and return for a special session if it's called.
After many grew used to living in isolation, the farmers market remains a place to gather and grow.
The Minnesota Department of Health said the two variants have become more dominant in the state, thoughs the variants have grown, the number of COVID-19 cases in Minnesota has continued to trend downward since mid-May. Those numbers could be deceiving, however.
“What we do know is that the rates of syphilis are troubling, especially the rise in congenital syphilis, or when a pregnant person passes syphilis to an infant,” Jones said.

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Transcranial magnetic stimulation uses magnetic pulses to activate parts of the brain that are underused in people with depressive symptoms. TMS is especially effective for medication-resistant depression.
Some have called the quasi-legalization a distinctly Minnesota version of recreational pot, dubbing it “3.2 cannabis.”
“It’s clear that monkeypox has come to Minnesota,” said state Epidemiologist Dr. Ruth Lynfield. “While our current cases are associated with travel outside Minnesota, we expect we will soon see cases among people who have no travel history or contact with someone who did, indicating that spread within social networks in Minnesota is occurring.”

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