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GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

DFL lawmakers are fast-tracked abortion protections through the capitol to get a bill to the governor’s desk. Gov. Tim Walz said signing the protections into law is a top priority.
A bill being fast-tracked by Democrats through the Legislature would require Minnesota utilities to have carbon-free electricity generation. It now awaits a vote of the full Senate.
The CROWN Act adds natural hairstyles and textures to the definition of race in the Minnesota Human Rights Act. Also: A bill to make Juneteenth a state holiday now awaits a vote in the House.
The Minnesota Legislature failed to pass a significant public infrastructure borrowing bill during the last session, leaving many local projects on hold.

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Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
Finalists include names like "Clearopathra" and "Just Scraping By."
Among other items, a Minnesota soybean leader said the Port of Duluth is still a major factor for success for the state and the country.
The final piece, released Tuesday, Jan. 24, includes what the governor touted as the biggest tax cut in Minnesota history.
The Northern Lights Express, or NLX, would connect downtown Minneapolis to the St. Louis County Depot in Duluth. Stops are planned in Coon Rapids, Cambridge, Hinckley and Superior, Wis. 
The proposals called for expanding affordable health care by establishing a MinnesotaCare public option and more than a billion dollars in affordable housing proposals over the next four years.

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The first piece of climate legislation to see significant movement this session is a bill that would require Minnesota utilities to have 100% carbon-free electricity generation by 2040.
According to a sheriff's office dispatch report, a caller reported $7,235 in allegedly missing funds from the city of Audubon on Jan. 10 and believed the previous clerk "wrote herself a check."
In the federal government's crackdown on sex trafficking in the '50s, law enforcement allied with trafficking victims, whose testimonies helped fuel the arrests of more than 100 in the Midwest.

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