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Herbs can boost flavor and your health. Here's a quick and easy way to make fresh herbs last longer

If you don't have a side veggie for tonight's dinner, no problem. Toss in a big bunch of fresh herbs. They're full of flavor and can boost your health. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams checks out the benefits of herbs and gives a tip on how to store them so they last longer.

Basil in the garden
Fresh herbs grow well in containers, raised beds or in the ground.
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ROCHESTER, Minn. — My garden is popping with herbs. Like other veggies, herbs are packed with heart-healthy compounds, such as polyphenols.

Researchers from the University of Alberta published a review paper on herbs in the journal Genes and Nutrition. They note that polyphenol-rich herbs help fight diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and arthritis. And herbs, including thyme, oregano, rosemary, sage, basil, mint, parsley and dill have anti-inflammatory effects in the body.

Both dried and fresh herbs can be healthy. Fresh herbs are delicious, especially when in season. But sometimes they don't last very long. Freezing them in ice cube trays will help them lasts weeks to months.

Here's how to freeze herbs for later use:

  • Rinse herbs and pat dry. Keep different herbs separate.
  • Chop each type of herb.
  • Fill ice cube tray molds with chopped herbs .
  • Pour in either a bit of water or olive oil.
  • Freeze.
  • Once frozen you can pop them out of the ice cube trays and into a freezer bag.

Use the herb ice cubes for drink and food recipes.

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Follow the  Health Fusion podcast on  Apple,   Spotify and  Google podcasts. For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at  vwilliams@newsmd.com. Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

MORE HEALTH FUSION:
Blood pressure, body weight, cholesterol and blood glucose are some of the numbers that measure heart health. The American Heart Association has added sleep to that list. Why? Because research about how sleep effects those numbers keeps emerging. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams talks to a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and sleep expert about why sleep is vital to your heart health.

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