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Minnesota State Patrol pilot injured when duck crashes through helicopter’s windshield mid-flight

The pilots were able to continue flying to the St. Paul airport, and emergency medical services and troopers provided medical aid to the injured pilot.

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A Minnesota State Patrol pilot was injured when a duck went through a helicopter’s windshield Wednesday evening, May 18, 2022 the State Patrol said.
Courtesy / Minnesota State Patrol via St. Paul Pioneer Press
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A Minnesota State Patrol pilot suffered a suspected head injury when a duck crashed through the windshield of a helicopter during a flight, according to information released by the State Patrol Thursday.

The pilots were able to continue flying to the St. Paul airport, and emergency medical services and troopers provided medical aid to the injured pilot. The pilot was transported to Regions Hospital with non-life threatening injuries, and was treated and released.

The State Patrol is assessing damage to the Bell 407 helicopter.

The helicopter and pilots were returning after providing assistance to law enforcement in Wabasha County who requested help about 10:15 p.m. Wednesday.

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