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Public Health hosts COVID-19 vaccine booster clinic

The next clinic is Friday, Oct. 7 at 22 Dayton Ave. SE, Wadena, at the Public Health building.

COVID BOOSTer.png
CDC recommends COVID-19 boosters for protection against illness.
Image contributed by Wadena County Public Health
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WADENA — The Moderna Covid-19 vaccine is available at Wadena County Public Health during an Oct. 7 clinic to people 6 months and older.
To make an appointment call 218-631-7629 or register online (using Google Chrome) with the link below:
October 7, 2022: 10 a.m. to noon
https://prepmod.health.state.mn.us/appointment/en/reg/9256201697

"During this time of COVID-19, we are asking people to come by appointment only and people 2 years old and older to wear a mask so we are able to administer vaccine in a safe manner," according to the Public Health news release.

The Moderna Bivalent Booster is recommended for all people age 18 and older regardless of their health condition and helps to protect against the original COVID-19 strain that has been in previous vaccines as well as against newer Omicron variants that are circulating.
COVID-19 Vaccines are available at no charge.
If you are unable to come during the time listed, please call.

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