As a part of the fifth- and sixth-grade Wadena-Deer Creek science fair, fifth-grade teachers Kendra Schultz and Lynn Quincer heard students’ interests and results from their science experiments on March 9-13. Students came in and out of the classrooms as they gathered their posters from the hallway, which was lined with approximately 70 posters noting questions, hypotheses, materials, data, procedures and conclusions following the scientific method.

Students become teachers in their short presentations. In Quincer’s class the favorite question became, “How did you come up with this idea?” Through the process, students learned the scientific method, which was the focus of the experiments, according to Schultz.

“I think that this project is a great project for the kids to be involved with their families, I see that often that grandparents get involved or aunts and uncles get involved to help the kids and I think that’s a great experience,” Schultz said.

When Morgan Pichardo’s name was picked to present, friends in the class cheered, “Wahoo!” He explained the way he tested for calmness in the eye of a hurricane with water swirling and pepper that came to the center when the water stopped swirling. Pichardo found this pretty cool, as he answered to Quincer’s question of why pepper. He also told his classmates that he came up with the idea after looking through a book and flipping to a random page, determined to complete whatever project was on that page.

In fifth-grade teacher Kendra Schultz's class on March 11, Geni Lease showed a piece of her data, an apple with a hair tie around it. Lease sought to answer the question, "How do you stop a cut apple from going brown?" and her conclusion showed that salt water obtained the best results.
In fifth-grade teacher Kendra Schultz's class on March 11, Geni Lease showed a piece of her data, an apple with a hair tie around it. Lease sought to answer the question, "How do you stop a cut apple from going brown?" and her conclusion showed that salt water obtained the best results.
With his hands cupped above his head, Sam Church demonstrated how he shot the basketball to see which location had the highest percentage of shots made. The two other locations were chest and chin, with chest having the highest percentage as Church predicted in his hypothesis.
With his hands cupped above his head, Sam Church demonstrated how he shot the basketball to see which location had the highest percentage of shots made. The two other locations were chest and chin, with chest having the highest percentage as Church predicted in his hypothesis.
Throughout the hallway a few students experimented with elephant's toothpaste, which mixes hydrogen peroxide, soap, yeast and warm water leading to a foamy substance, according to Scholastic. Rhyis Udy, a fifth grade student in Lynn Quincer's class, compared the weight of this reaction to 12 sheets of paper.
Throughout the hallway a few students experimented with elephant's toothpaste, which mixes hydrogen peroxide, soap, yeast and warm water leading to a foamy substance, according to Scholastic. Rhyis Udy, a fifth grade student in Lynn Quincer's class, compared the weight of this reaction to 12 sheets of paper.
Payton Gravelle shared her hypothesis of Coke creating the shiniest penny due to the high acidity of the drink but her conclusion showed lemon juice as the proven winner. Students asked which substance was the worst and Gravelle immediately proceeded to rank the substances.
Payton Gravelle shared her hypothesis of Coke creating the shiniest penny due to the high acidity of the drink but her conclusion showed lemon juice as the proven winner. Students asked which substance was the worst and Gravelle immediately proceeded to rank the substances.
Arrow Colling-Henderson considered how magnets work in different temperatures after deciding he wanted to do a project on magnets. During his presentation, Colling-Henderson pointed out the areas he was teaching on and explained his data, which lead to the conclusion of his correctly proven hypothesis that the magnets performed better in cold temperatures.
Arrow Colling-Henderson considered how magnets work in different temperatures after deciding he wanted to do a project on magnets. During his presentation, Colling-Henderson pointed out the areas he was teaching on and explained his data, which lead to the conclusion of his correctly proven hypothesis that the magnets performed better in cold temperatures.
When Riley Plautz's turn came, it was sunny side up as he shared just how much salt an egg requires to float. After two tablespoons of salt and one and one-half cups of water, the raw egg floated, which made his hypothesis correct as a fellow student pointed out.
When Riley Plautz's turn came, it was sunny side up as he shared just how much salt an egg requires to float. After two tablespoons of salt and one and one-half cups of water, the raw egg floated, which made his hypothesis correct as a fellow student pointed out.
Each student presenter called on their classmates to answer questions such as, "Did you use the same magnet?" or "Did you do the experiment all in one day?"
Each student presenter called on their classmates to answer questions such as, "Did you use the same magnet?" or "Did you do the experiment all in one day?"
Arbrianna Polan experimented with food coloring and celery, testing yellow, blue, red and purple food colorings and how much the celery absorbed the color and the water.
Arbrianna Polan experimented with food coloring and celery, testing yellow, blue, red and purple food colorings and how much the celery absorbed the color and the water.
With a shining poster and smile, Zoie Ellingson answered unexpected questions from her classmates about her project on dissolving dog treats in water, vinegar and pop.
With a shining poster and smile, Zoie Ellingson answered unexpected questions from her classmates about her project on dissolving dog treats in water, vinegar and pop.
Morgan Pichardo began his presentation on the eye of a hurricane, which he knew was the calmest part of the storm but enjoyed seeing just how it worked. He swirled water with pepper in it to follow the results and shared that you can survive in the eye of a hurricane, if you can get in it.
Morgan Pichardo began his presentation on the eye of a hurricane, which he knew was the calmest part of the storm but enjoyed seeing just how it worked. He swirled water with pepper in it to follow the results and shared that you can survive in the eye of a hurricane, if you can get in it.