A woman in a teal shirt with glittery details around the neck leans against a weathered wooden gate. Her arms are crossed and she's smiling.

Jenny Schlecht

Editor

Jenny Schlecht is Agweek's director of ag content. She serves as editor of Agweek, Sugarbeet Grower and BeanGrower. She lives with her husband and two daughters on a farm and ranch in Medina, North Dakota — a perfect vantage point for writing agriculture and rural news.

Jenny grew up on a farm and ranch outside Billings, Montana. She graduated from the University of Mary with a bachelor's degree in communications and a minor in psychology. She previously worked as a police and courts reporter and assistant city editor at the Bismarck (N.D.) Tribune.

Jenny can be reached at jschlecht@agweek.com or 701-595-0425.

"I wish we could do away with some of the romanticism surrounding agriculture. By embracing technology, research and innovation, we can deal with today's problems and move toward a better tomorrow."
Many parts from Laura Ingalls Wilder's "The Long Winter" ring very true today.
Jayson Lusk, a distinguished professor and head of the Agricultural Economics Department at Purdue University in Indiana, has some ideas where the future of food and agriculture is headed.
Jenny Schlecht bids farewell to the insulated coveralls she'd worn since childhood.
Jenny Schlecht explains how a "where are you" call led to an evening of protecting barn cats and hunting raccoons.
"It's pretty easy to forget that the rest of us can stay inside and not deal with these things only because there are people who willingly go outside every day and do the work. When you pull a package of hamburger or a steak from your freezer, remember the ones who raised the cattle and say a little prayer for their safety and well-being."
Jenny Schlecht reflects on the little irritants on a farm, like the dust from pushing cattle or unloading corn and how it can affect parts of day-to-day life.
Jenny Schlecht ponders the continuing legacy of her husband's great-grandmother, whose recipe continues to be used to raise thousands of dollars for good causes and whose progeny show up to help in the efforts.
The National 4-H Council plans to use the $50 million that writer and philanthropist MacKenzie Scott donated to boost training and programming for both adult leaders and for the youth they serve.
The smell of the ranch in the fall is far more than just the manure; it's all the comforting things that farm kids grow to associate with home.