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Interdisciplinary landscape artist to speak Friday

David Andree, the New York Mills Regional Cultural Center's Artist-in-Residence for the first two weeks of July, is excited to talk transitions, movement, form and the changing nature of landscape Friday, July 15.

Landscape operates on a unique sense of time. Andree is attracted to its slow changes: delicate shifts of light, transitions of weather or the seasons, the gradual resurgence of a forest, movement such as the ever-changing topographies of flowing water, or even our own movements through the landscape, which could be a simple shifting of weight that re-orientates relationships of forms to one another. He finds himself attracted to moments of tension between what was, what is, and what will be, perpetually chasing the qualities of the fleeting present.

While on residency in New York Mills, Andree reconnects to his native Minnesota landscape through two projects. Originating from the desire to explore the effects of water on color, his Water Color studies begin by creating a color-field painting which is then submerged under water in order to observe the color change that the given body of water produces. This process is repeated, while continually changing the color plate to match the observed color of the submerged painting. Each step is photographed to complete the gestalt of these pieces.

In an attempt to capture water current, through a second project, transitory sculptures are created by pouring liquid wax into water resulting in intricate castings of flux. The current of the water and changing surface topography manipulate the wax as it cools and solidifies resulting in shifting fragile forms.

These projects will be exhibited and discussed at an artist talk at 7 p.m. Friday, July 15 in the main gallery of the cultural center. The talk is free to attend. Light refreshments will be served.

For more information, call the cultural center at (218) 385-3339 or visit the center's website at www.kulcher.org.

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