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'Let's Be Cops' If you're looking for laughs, that's what you get

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I had the opportunity to watch 'Let's Be Cops' last week with a friend. I was in a foul mood and hoped this film would change that. The film sure did deliver. I cannot remember a film which made me laugh so hard as 'Let's Be Cops' did.

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The premise of the film is a bit unbelievable - two lifelong friends who, after a costume party in which they finally get some respect when dressed as police officers, decide to actually pretend to be cops.

Luke Greenfield directs actors Damon Wayans, Jr. (Justin) and Jake Johnson (Ryan) in this hilariously silly film. Justin is a struggling video game creator working for a tyrant boss (played by Jonathan Lajoie). Ryan is a washed up football player whose fledging career is cut short by an injury caused by his own stupidity. He spends his days "working" as Justin's assistant and playing neighborhood football with pre-teens.

As the two dress in costumes for their college reunion, they are suddenly given respect by strangers on the street. They have fun with this, commanding people to halt and getting attention from girls. One particular woman, Josie (played by Nina Dobrev), finally speaks to Justin, who has been crushing on her for quite some time.

After the fun night of playacting, Ryan gets the not-so-bright idea to actually pretend to be cops, going so far as to buy a patrol car off Ebay and promote himself to Sergeant.

A run in with super-baddie Mossi (James D'Arcy) leads to a comical string of events in which Ryan convinces Justin that they need to nail Mossi and bring him to justice. An unlikely partnership with ex-con Pupa (Keegan-Michael Key) and real cop segars (played by the witty Rob Riggle) round out the film.

When Justin finds out that it actually is highly illegal to impersonate a cop, the guys are in too deep to quit, being the target of thugs and placing themselves in dangerous situations with alarming regularity.

Though at times the film seems formulaic in following the buddy-cop genre, the viewer will surprisingly become emotionally invested in Justin and Ryan. The gags and jokes will have your belly sore from laughing.

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